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Octopus, cuttlefish, and squid extensively edit messenger RNAs in an evolutionarily conserved process. 

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image: Genome Digest

Genome Digest

By | August 17, 2015

What researchers are learning as they sequence, map, and decode species’ genomes

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image: Light Sensors in Cephalopod Skin

Light Sensors in Cephalopod Skin

By | May 21, 2015

Squid, cuttlefish, and octopuses possess vision machinery in their skin.

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image: Squid-Inspired Electric Elastomer

Squid-Inspired Electric Elastomer

By | September 18, 2014

Polymer changes color and texture in response to remote signals. 

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image: Cephalopod Coddling

Cephalopod Coddling

By | August 1, 2014

Deep-sea octopus has the longest-known brooding period known for any animal species.

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image: How the Octopus Keeps Its Arms Straight

How the Octopus Keeps Its Arms Straight

By | May 15, 2014

Researchers uncover a self-recognition mechanism that prevents octopus limbs from becoming entangled, despite their powerful suction.

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image: Groovy Color

Groovy Color

By | July 1, 2013

To control their color displays, squid fine-tune the optical properties of light-reflecting cells by rapidly expelling and imbibing water across a tightly pleated membrane

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image: Cephalopod-Inspired Robot

Cephalopod-Inspired Robot

By | August 17, 2012

A color-changing machine mimics the rubbery body and flexible movements of octopuses, squid, and cuttlefish.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | January 31, 2012

A roundup of recent studies in behavior research

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