The Scientist

» biodiversity and immunology

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image: Ocean Acidity Affects Climate

Ocean Acidity Affects Climate

By | August 27, 2013

Acidification of the oceans may lead to lower sulfur levels in the atmosphere, worsening the effects of climate change.


image: Loss of Bees Bad for Plants

Loss of Bees Bad for Plants

By | July 23, 2013

Removing just a single bee species from an ecosystem can decrease the ability of the remaining species to pollinate plants.

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image: New Giant Viruses Break Records

New Giant Viruses Break Records

By | July 22, 2013

Two newly discovered giant viruses are bigger than many bacteria and carry massive and largely unique genomes that hint at new branches of life.

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image: Week in Review, July 15–19

Week in Review, July 15–19

By | July 19, 2013

Bias in preclinical research; medical marijuana for kids; a swath of microbial genomes; plastic ocean habitats; rethinking scientific evaluation


image: Week in Review, July 8–12

Week in Review, July 8–12

By | July 12, 2013

Editor accused of fraud leaves post; the good and the bad of gut microbiota; bacterial gene shuffle; legal restrictions hamper illicit drug research; antibodies and autism


image: Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

Side-Chain Theory, circa 1900

By | July 1, 2013

Paul Ehrlich came up with an explanation for cellular interactions based on receptors, earning a Nobel Prize and the title "Father of Modern Immunology"—only to have his theory forgotten.


image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity


image: Pesticides Decimate Biodiversity

Pesticides Decimate Biodiversity

By | June 19, 2013

Agricultural pesticides, even when used at levels considered safe, can cause devastating losses of invertebrate species.


image: Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

Platelets Help Tackle Bacteria

By | June 16, 2013

The cell fragments play a role in the body’s first line of defense against bacterial infection, helping white blood cells grab blood-borne bacteria in the liver.


Malaria parasites transmitted via mosquitoes elicit a more effective immune response and cause less severe infection than those directly injected into red blood cells.


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