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image: Mimicking Mussels

Mimicking Mussels

By | April 1, 2013

Scientists develop a gel that mimics mollusc glue to coat the insides of blood vessels.

1 Comment

image: Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

Antibody-Dependent Enhanced (ADE) Immunity

By | March 2, 2013

The method to the dengue virus's maddening infectiousness.

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image: Bedeviled by Dengue

Bedeviled by Dengue

By | March 1, 2013

The global spread of dengue virus has immunologists and public-health experts debating the best way to curb infection.

5 Comments

image: Opinion: Biodiversity Impacts Humanity

Opinion: Biodiversity Impacts Humanity

By | February 20, 2013

Increasing evidence suggests that loss of Earth’s biological diversity will compromise our planet’s ability to provide the goods and services societies need to prosper.

2 Comments

image: Diversity Defeats Disease

Diversity Defeats Disease

By | February 13, 2013

In a pond, more amphibian species mean decreased chances of disease spread.

2 Comments

image: Do Mice Make Bad Models?

Do Mice Make Bad Models?

By | February 11, 2013

A study suggests that some mouse models do not accurately mimic human molecular mechanisms of inflammatory response, but other mouse strains may fare better.

4 Comments

image: New TB Vaccine Fails Trial

New TB Vaccine Fails Trial

By | February 4, 2013

One of the most advanced tuberculosis vaccines has failed to protect infants from getting the disease in a clinical trial, but it may be effective in adults.

1 Comment

image: A Chill Issue

A Chill Issue

By | February 1, 2013

The very cold, the merely chilled, and the colorful

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image: Immune to Failure

Immune to Failure

By | February 1, 2013

With dogged persistence and an unwillingness to entertain defeat, Bruce Beutler discovered a receptor that powers the innate immune response to infections—and earned his share of a Nobel Prize.

2 Comments

image: Rhinoviruses Exposed

Rhinoviruses Exposed

By | February 1, 2013

Some of these insidious viruses expertly subvert the host immune system, allowing their unhindered proliferation.

0 Comments

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