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image: SUNY-ESF’s Top 10 New Species 2016

SUNY-ESF’s Top 10 New Species 2016

By | May 24, 2016

A look at State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry scientists’ picks

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image: Population Ecologist Dies

Population Ecologist Dies

By | May 18, 2016

Ilkka Hanski of the University of Helsinki has passed away at age 63.

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image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks. 

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image: Earth: Home to 1 Trillion Microbial Species

Earth: Home to 1 Trillion Microbial Species

By | May 4, 2016

A new analysis of microbial data estimates that the world is home to 1 trillion species—of which only 0.001 percent have been discovered.

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image: Observing the Nuclear Pore

Observing the Nuclear Pore

By | May 2, 2016

Scientists visualize nuclear pore complexes for the first time, using high-speed atomic force microscopy.

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image: Fuchs on the Future

Fuchs on the Future

By | May 1, 2016

Rockefeller University researcher Elaine Fuchs on being a woman in science and her contributions to the burgeoning field of reverse genetics

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | May 1, 2016

An alternative route to sparking cell signals involves hook-ups between transmembrane and soluble ligands.

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image: More Than Skin Deep

More Than Skin Deep

By | May 1, 2016

Elaine Fuchs has worked on adult stem cells since before they were so named, figuring out how multipotent epidermal cells renew or turn into skin or hair follicles.

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image: “Hunger Hormone” No More?

“Hunger Hormone” No More?

By | April 20, 2016

Ghrelin promotes fat storage not feeding, according to a study.

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image: Zooming In on an Antidepressant Target

Zooming In on an Antidepressant Target

By | April 6, 2016

Structural studies reveal how SSRI drugs bind to the human serotonin transporter.

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