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» biodiversity and developmental biology

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image: Archaean Prey

Archaean Prey

By | March 13, 2012

Animals can and do eat Archaea.

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image: Small Shark Species Discovered

Small Shark Species Discovered

By | March 7, 2012

Deep diving scientists near the Galapagos Islands churn up a new shark variety, measuring just over 1 foot long.

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image: How to Make Eyeball Stew

How to Make Eyeball Stew

By | March 1, 2012

Editor's choice in developmental biology

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image: Model Citizen

Model Citizen

By | March 1, 2012

With an eye to understanding animal regeneration, Alejandro Sánchez Alvarado has turned a freshwater planarian into a model system to watch.

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image: How Tigers Get Their Stripes

How Tigers Get Their Stripes

By | February 22, 2012

For the first time researchers have demonstrated the molecular tango that gives rise to repeating patterns in developing animal embryos.

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image: Cell Change Up

Cell Change Up

By | February 9, 2012

Imaging cell cytoskeletons during early embryonic development leads researchers to uncover a new regulator of cell shape

3 Comments

image: Cyan Wonders

Cyan Wonders

By | February 1, 2012

In 1842, Anna Atkins, a 43-year-old amateur botanist from Kent, England, began experimenting with a brand-new photographic process called cyanotype or blue-print. 

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image: Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

Botanical Blueprints, circa 1843

By | February 1, 2012

Anna Atkins, pioneering female photographer, revolutionized scientific illustration using a newly invented photographic technique.

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image: Genghis Jon

Genghis Jon

By | February 1, 2012

By helping Mongolians cultivate an understanding of their native insect fauna, scientists hope to protect the country's unique yet fragile ecosystems.

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image: Swarming Mongolia

Swarming Mongolia

By | February 1, 2012

For the past decade and a half, a crew of about 20 entomologists, water ecologists, and other specialists converges on the shorelines of Mongolia’s lakes, rivers, and streams, just when swarms of aquatic insects do the same.

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