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image: Week in Review: April 1-5

Week in Review: April 1-5

By | April 5, 2013

Living fossils not so fossilized; Canadian gov’t threatens scientists’ freedom to speak and publish; gene therapy for sensory disorders; an unusual theory of cancer; clues for an HIV vaccine

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image: The Falsity of Living Fossils

The Falsity of Living Fossils

By | April 2, 2013

New studies of tadpole shrimp and other organisms show that the term “living fossil” is inaccurate and misleading.

5 Comments

image: Icy Veins

Icy Veins

By | April 2, 2013

Intrepid Norwegian explorers discovered the Antarctic icefish, a marvel of evolution, while venturing to an island at the bottom of the Earth in 1927.

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"White-Blooded" Icefish, 1927

By | April 1, 2013

A bizarre group of Antarctic fishes lost their red blood cells but survived to tell their evolutionary tale, revealing a fundamental lesson about the birth and death of genes.

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image: Book Excerpt from Rough and Tumble

Book Excerpt from Rough and Tumble

By | April 1, 2013

In Chapter 3, “Tamping the Simian Urge,” author Travis Rayne Pickering contrasts the brute physicality of predatory chimpanzees with the headier hunting style employed by humans.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2013

Leopold, The Drunken Botanist, Beautiful Whale, and Between Man and Beast

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image: The Roots of Violence

The Roots of Violence

By | April 1, 2013

Archaeology can shine needed light on the evolution of our aggressive tendencies.

6 Comments

image: The Upside of Suicide

The Upside of Suicide

By | March 20, 2013

Researchers show that a bacterium’s self-sacrifice can benefit its community, even when the members are not strongly related.

4 Comments

image: Sequencing the Underdogs

Sequencing the Underdogs

By | March 8, 2013

Transcriptome studies reveal new insights about unusual animals whose genomes have not been sequenced.

2 Comments

image: Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

By | March 7, 2013

A red alga appears to have adapted to extremely hot, acidic environments by collecting genes from bacteria and archaea.

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