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» biodiversity and evolution

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image: Finding Phasmids

Finding Phasmids

By | June 1, 2012

Researchers rediscover a giant insect, thought to have gone extinct a century ago, and plan to reintroduce it to its native island off the coast of Australia.

6 Comments

image: Hacking the Genome

Hacking the Genome

By | June 1, 2012

In pondering genome structure and function, evolutionary geneticist Laurence Hurst has arrived at some unanticipated conclusions about how natural selection has molded our DNA.

6 Comments

image: Opinion: Saving Species through Economics

Opinion: Saving Species through Economics

By | May 21, 2012

Successful conservation depends on an economy that doesn’t incentivize destruction of species and habitats.

4 Comments

image: Revenge of the Weeds

Revenge of the Weeds

By | May 20, 2012

Plant pests are evolving to outsmart common herbicides, costing farmers crops and money.

33 Comments

image: Live Slow, Die Old

Live Slow, Die Old

By | May 17, 2012

Ancient bacteria living in deep-sea sediments are alive—but with metabolisms so slow that it’s hard to tell.

13 Comments

image: Climate Change Threatens Mammals

Climate Change Threatens Mammals

By | May 16, 2012

Almost 10 percent of mammals in the Western Hemisphere won’t be able to shift their territories in time to avoid the consequences of climate change.

9 Comments

image: How Prawns Lure Prey

How Prawns Lure Prey

By | May 15, 2012

Orange-loving Trinidad guppies are curiously attracted to orange spots on prawn pincers, which may make it easier for the predators to snatch them up.

1 Comment

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | May 15, 2012

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

5 Comments

image: Online Map of Life

Online Map of Life

By | May 11, 2012

An interactive web tool that allows users to visualize world-wide species distributions is now available on the Web.

1 Comment

image: Bones Won’t Be Buried Yet

Bones Won’t Be Buried Yet

By | May 10, 2012

Two 9,000-year-old skeletons will be held by University of California, San Diego, officials—rather than turned over to American Indians for reburial—until a lawsuit is settled.

6 Comments

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