Advertisement
NeuroScientistNews
NeuroScientistNews

The Scientist

» mammals and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Surprising Similarities in Divergent Genomes

Surprising Similarities in Divergent Genomes

By | September 4, 2013

Researchers find genome-wide evidence of convergent evolution between bats and dolphins.

3 Comments

image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.

0 Comments

image: Ancient Mammalian Fossil Found

Ancient Mammalian Fossil Found

By | August 16, 2013

The chipmunk-sized Rugosodon eurasiaticus is the oldest representative of a prolific and long-lasting mammalian lineage.

0 Comments

image: New Carnivorous Mammal Discovered

New Carnivorous Mammal Discovered

By | August 15, 2013

The olinguito, misidentified by zookeepers and museum curators for nearly a century, is the first new carnivorous mammal discovered in the Western Hemisphere in 35 years.

4 Comments

image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.

17 Comments

image: Fossils Snarl Mammalian Roots

Fossils Snarl Mammalian Roots

By | August 7, 2013

Two newly discovered Jurassic-era fossils suggest drastically different mammalian origins.

2 Comments

image: The Roots of Monogamy

The Roots of Monogamy

By | July 31, 2013

A new analysis suggests that infanticide drove the evolution of pair living in some primate species, though another study reaches a different conclusion.

4 Comments

image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

0 Comments

image: Nailing Regeneration

Nailing Regeneration

By | June 12, 2013

Researchers identify the signaling program that enables finger and toenail stem cells to direct digit regeneration after amputation.

0 Comments

image: Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

By | June 7, 2013

In avian species, a gene induces programmed cell death during development in the area where a phallus would otherwise grow.

1 Comment

Follow The Scientist

icon-facebook icon-linkedin icon-twitter icon-vimeo icon-youtube
Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist

Stay Connected with The Scientist

  • icon-facebook The Scientist Magazine
  • icon-facebook The Scientist Careers
  • icon-facebook Neuroscience Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Genetic Research Techniques
  • icon-facebook Cell Culture Techniques
  • icon-facebook Microbiology and Immunology
  • icon-facebook Cancer Research and Technology
  • icon-facebook Stem Cell and Regenerative Science
Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist
Advertisement
The Scientist
The Scientist
Life Technologies