The Scientist

» mammals and developmental biology

Most Recent

image: Surprising Similarities in Divergent Genomes

Surprising Similarities in Divergent Genomes

By | September 4, 2013

Researchers find genome-wide evidence of convergent evolution between bats and dolphins.


image: Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

Bacterial Quid Pro Quo

By | August 19, 2013

Pseudomonas aeruginosa gather swarming speed at the expense of their ability to form biofilms in an experimental evolution setup.


image: Ancient Mammalian Fossil Found

Ancient Mammalian Fossil Found

By | August 16, 2013

The chipmunk-sized Rugosodon eurasiaticus is the oldest representative of a prolific and long-lasting mammalian lineage.


image: New Carnivorous Mammal Discovered

New Carnivorous Mammal Discovered

By | August 15, 2013

The olinguito, misidentified by zookeepers and museum curators for nearly a century, is the first new carnivorous mammal discovered in the Western Hemisphere in 35 years.


image: Stem Cells Open Up Options

Stem Cells Open Up Options

By | August 13, 2013

Pluripotent cells can help regenerate tissues and maintain long life—and they may also help animals jumpstart drastically new lifestyles.


image: Fossils Snarl Mammalian Roots

Fossils Snarl Mammalian Roots

By | August 7, 2013

Two newly discovered Jurassic-era fossils suggest drastically different mammalian origins.


image: The Roots of Monogamy

The Roots of Monogamy

By | July 31, 2013

A new analysis suggests that infanticide drove the evolution of pair living in some primate species, though another study reaches a different conclusion.


image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity


image: Nailing Regeneration

Nailing Regeneration

By | June 12, 2013

Researchers identify the signaling program that enables finger and toenail stem cells to direct digit regeneration after amputation.


image: Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

By | June 7, 2013

In avian species, a gene induces programmed cell death during development in the area where a phallus would otherwise grow.

1 Comment

Popular Now

  1. Birth of the Skin Microbiome
    Daily News Birth of the Skin Microbiome

    The immune system tolerates the colonization of commensal bacteria on the skin with the aid of regulatory T cells during the first few weeks of life, a mouse study shows.

  2. Inside a Lab Mouse’s High-Fat Diet
  3. Battling the Bulge
    Bio Business Battling the Bulge

    Weight-loss drugs that target newly characterized obesity-related receptors and pathways could finally offer truly effective fat control.

  4. How Gastric Bypass Can Kill Sugar Cravings
Life Technologies