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image: New Carnivorous Mammal Discovered

New Carnivorous Mammal Discovered

By | August 15, 2013

The olinguito, misidentified by zookeepers and museum curators for nearly a century, is the first new carnivorous mammal discovered in the Western Hemisphere in 35 years.

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image: Fossils Snarl Mammalian Roots

Fossils Snarl Mammalian Roots

By | August 7, 2013

Two newly discovered Jurassic-era fossils suggest drastically different mammalian origins.

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image: The Roots of Monogamy

The Roots of Monogamy

By | July 31, 2013

A new analysis suggests that infanticide drove the evolution of pair living in some primate species, though another study reaches a different conclusion.

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image: Building Complex Brains

Building Complex Brains

By | April 29, 2013

Manipulating a gene that regulates folding in the cerebral cortex can make mouse brains look more human.

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image: Fly Guts Reveal Animal Inventory

Fly Guts Reveal Animal Inventory

By | January 7, 2013

Stomachs of flesh-eating flies carry the DNA of animals in remote rainforests.

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image: Climate Change Threatens Mammals

Climate Change Threatens Mammals

By | May 16, 2012

Almost 10 percent of mammals in the Western Hemisphere won’t be able to shift their territories in time to avoid the consequences of climate change.

9 Comments

image: There and Back Again

There and Back Again

By | February 1, 2012

A new study estimates the number of generations necessary to evolve from mouse-sized to elephantine, and shows that it’s quicker to get small.

9 Comments

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