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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.


image: Ancient Sex

Ancient Sex

By | October 19, 2014

Fossils of an extinct, armored fish challenge current understanding of when copulation and internal fertilization evolved in jawed vertebrates.


image: Predator Demoted

Predator Demoted

By | October 1, 2014

Extinct, giant arthropods, long assumed to be top predators of ancient seas, didn’t have sharp enough eyesight to be refined hunters.

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image: Ancient Algae or Early Animals?

Ancient Algae or Early Animals?

By | September 29, 2014

Tiny spherical fossils found in China appear to be multicellular organisms with differentiated tissues.


image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.


image: Prehistoric Critters Change View of Mammal Evolution

Prehistoric Critters Change View of Mammal Evolution

By | September 12, 2014

Three extinct squirrel-like species were identified from Jurassic-era fossils in China.

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image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

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image: A Rock and a Hard Place

A Rock and a Hard Place

By | July 1, 2014

Meet the retired chemical engineer who has made quite the impression on paleoentomology by uncovering ancient secrets of insect coitus.


image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

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image: Ancient Apoptosis

Ancient Apoptosis

By | June 9, 2014

Humans and coral share a cell-death pathway that has been conserved between them for more than half a billion years.



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