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image: Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

Microbes Play Role in Anti-Tumor Response

By | November 5, 2015

Gut microbiome composition can influence the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy in mice.

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image: Ebola’s Immune Escape

Ebola’s Immune Escape

By | November 3, 2015

The virus can persist in several tissues where the immune system is less active. Researchers are working to better understand this phenomenon and how it can stall the clearing of Ebola in survivors.

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image: Fanning the Flames

Fanning the Flames

By | November 1, 2015

Obesity triggers a fatty acid synthesis pathway, which in turn helps drive T cell differentiation and inflammation.

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image: Not Immune to Fat

Not Immune to Fat

By | November 1, 2015

The effect of a high-fat diet on murine T cells

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image: Ancient DNA Sheds Light on Peopling of Americas

Ancient DNA Sheds Light on Peopling of Americas

By | October 28, 2015

An analysis of centuries-old genetic material from two infants who lived near the Bering Strait suggests that people came to North America in a single wave from Asia about 25,000 years ago.

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image: Weak Support for Malaria Vaccine

Weak Support for Malaria Vaccine

By | October 27, 2015

The World Health Organization recommends more pilot trials.

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image: B Cells Can Drive Inflammation in MS

B Cells Can Drive Inflammation in MS

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers identify a subset of proinflammatory cytokine-producing B cells that may spark multiple sclerosis-related inflammation.  

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image: Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

Two-Faced Proteins May Tackle HIV Reservoirs

By | October 21, 2015

Researchers design antibody-like proteins to awaken and destroy HIV holdouts.

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image: Fossil Teeth Rewrite Human Migration to Asia

Fossil Teeth Rewrite Human Migration to Asia

By | October 16, 2015

Researchers in China have discovered 47 human teeth and suggest that they are between 80,000 and 120,000 years old—about 30,000 years earlier than Homo sapiens were believed to have made it to Asia.

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image: <em>Homo naledi</em>’s Hands and Feet

Homo naledi’s Hands and Feet

By | October 6, 2015

Two new analyses of fossil remains from the recently discovered human relative suggest the species may have been uniquely adapted to both terrestrial and arboreal locomotion.

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