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image: Micronutrients, Macro Impact

Micronutrients, Macro Impact

By | June 1, 2017

At the interface of food, nutrition, and agriculture, Lindsay Allen’s research has been informing nutrition guidelines and policies around the world for decades.

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image: Pinpointing the Culprit

Pinpointing the Culprit

By | June 1, 2017

Identifying immune cell subsets with CyTOF

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image: The Celiac Surge

The Celiac Surge

By | June 1, 2017

A rapid increase in the global incidence of the condition has researchers scrambling to understand the causes of the trend, and cope with the consequences.

4 Comments

image: Image of the Day: 3-Billion-Year-Old Bubbles 

Image of the Day: 3-Billion-Year-Old Bubbles 

By | May 10, 2017

Fossilized gas bubbles, formed from being trapped by microbial biofilms, provide the oldest signature of life in terrestrial hot springs.

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image: Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

Quick and Cheap Zika Detection

By | May 3, 2017

A heat block, a truck battery, and a novel RNA amplification assay make for in-the-field surveillance of the virus.

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Studies of infected rhesus monkeys reveal the virus’s long-term hiding places in the body.

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image: Image of the Day: Bygone Blood Cells

Image of the Day: Bygone Blood Cells

By | April 11, 2017

These fossilized red blood cells (right), found in an ancient, blood-engorged Amblyomma tick (left), likely belonged to primates.

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image: Image of the Day: Ancient Worm

Image of the Day: Ancient Worm

By | April 10, 2017

Unlike related species, Ovatiovermis cribratus, a lobopodian from the Cambrian period, did not have a hard, protective shell.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2017 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Hitting It Out of the Park

Hitting It Out of the Park

By | April 1, 2017

Cancer can be as evasive and slippery as a spitball, but new immunotherapies are starting to connect.

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