The Scientist

» mouse model, evolution and neuroscience

Most Recent

image: Out in the Cold

Out in the Cold

By | March 1, 2016

Serotonin’s long-debated role in sleep promotion is temperature-dependent.

1 Comment

image: Sleep Circuit

Sleep Circuit

By | March 1, 2016

A web of cell types in one of the brain’s chief wake centers keeps animals up—but also puts them to sleep.

0 Comments

image: Slumber Numbers

Slumber Numbers

By | March 1, 2016

Ideas abound for why some animal species sleep so much more than others, but definitive data are elusive.

0 Comments

image: Sugar Time

Sugar Time

By | March 1, 2016

Metabolic activity, not light, drives the circadian clock in cyanobacteria.

0 Comments

image: What Lies Sleeping

What Lies Sleeping

By | March 1, 2016

Why can science still not define this most basic biological process?

0 Comments

image: Characterizing Sleep

Characterizing Sleep

By and | March 1, 2016

Sleep-like patterns of neural activity are apparent not just at the level of the whole brain, but also in isolated neural circuits.

0 Comments

image: Go To Bed!

Go To Bed!

By | March 1, 2016

The immediate consequences of losing out on sleep may be harbingers of long-term repercussions.

0 Comments

image: Sleep’s Kernel

Sleep’s Kernel

By and | March 1, 2016

Surprisingly small sections of brain, and even neuronal and glial networks in a dish, display many electrical indicators of sleep.

1 Comment

image: Who Sleeps?

Who Sleeps?

By and | March 1, 2016

Once believed to be unique to birds and mammals, sleep is found across the metazoan kingdom. Some animals, it seems, can’t live without it, though no one knows exactly why.

5 Comments

image: Week in Review: February 22–26

Week in Review: February 22–26

By | February 26, 2016

Questions about how E. coli evolves; spermatids in a dish; fighting bacteria with virus-like molecule; what drives metastasis; antibodies fight Ebola in monkeys

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Mapping the Human Connectome
    Daily News Mapping the Human Connectome

    A new map of human cortex combines data from multiple imaging modalities and comprises 180 distinct regions.

  2. Will Organs-in-a-Dish Ever Replace Animal Models?
  3. Neurons Compete to Form Memories
  4. The Genetic Components of Rare Diseases
RayBiotech