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The Scientist

» obama, developmental biology and microbiology

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image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

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image: TB Traces

TB Traces

By | August 1, 2015

Take a trip to the mummy museum in Vác, Hungary, to see the human remains that helped researchers learn more about the origins of tuberculosis in Europe.

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image: The Prescient Placenta

The Prescient Placenta

By | August 1, 2015

The maternal-fetal interface plays important roles in the health of both mother and baby, even after birth.

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image: Anthrax Sent in Error to 86 Labs

Anthrax Sent in Error to 86 Labs

By | July 29, 2015

A US Army lab shipped live spores of the deadly bacterium because of improper irradiation protocols, a Department of Defense review has found.

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image: Antibiotic Resistance Can Boost Bacterial Fitness

Antibiotic Resistance Can Boost Bacterial Fitness

By | July 22, 2015

In some pathogenic bacteria, certain antibiotic resistance–associated mutations may also confer an unexpected growth advantage.

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image: Underground Immunity

Underground Immunity

By | July 16, 2015

Arabidopsis thaliana defense hormones shape the plant’s root microbiome. 

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image: Microbiome Teams Up Against <em>C. diff</em>

Microbiome Teams Up Against C. diff

By | July 14, 2015

Researchers build a mathematical model that can predict whether a mouse will be infected by Clostridium difficile based on the microbes found in its GI tract.

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image: Evolution of Kin Discrimination

Evolution of Kin Discrimination

By | July 6, 2015

A bacterium’s ability to distinguish self from non-self can arise spontaneously, a study shows, reigniting questions of whether the trait can be considered an adaptation.

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image: Gutless Worm

Gutless Worm

By | July 1, 2015

Meet the digestive tract–lacking oligochaete that has fueled Max Planck researcher Nicole Dubilier’s interest in symbiosis and marine science.

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image: Sold on Symbiosis

Sold on Symbiosis

By | July 1, 2015

A love of the ocean lured Nicole Dubilier into science; gutless sea worms and their nurturing bacterial symbionts keep her at the leading edge of marine microbiology.

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