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image: Image of the Day: Lighting Up the Sea

Image of the Day: Lighting Up the Sea

By | March 22, 2017

The Hawaiian bobtail squid (Euprymna scolopes) is a nocturnal predator with a light organ full of bioluminescent bacteria attached to an ink sac, which the animal uses to control the amount of light it releases.

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image: San People Write Ethical Code for Research

San People Write Ethical Code for Research

By | March 21, 2017

With lifestyles similar to our hunter-gatherer ancestors, the San people of Southern Africa are popular study subjects.

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image: Singing Through Tone Deafness

Singing Through Tone Deafness

By | March 17, 2017

Author Tim Falconer didn't take his congenital amusia lying down. With the help of neuroscientists and vocal coaches, he tried to teach himself to sing against all odds.

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image: Image of the Day: Whale Watching

Image of the Day: Whale Watching

By | March 8, 2017

Scientists capture the True’s beaked whale (Mesoplodon mirus) on film for the first time.

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image: How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

By | March 1, 2017

One author's journey through the science of his congenital amusia

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image: Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

Musical Tastes: Nature or Nurture?

By | March 1, 2017

Studies of remote Amazonian villages reveal how culture influences our musical preferences.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | March 1, 2017

Music, the future of American science, and more

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An experiment in which people pass each other initially nonrhythmic drumming sequences reveals the human affinity for musical patterns.

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image: Image of the Day: Penguin Run

Image of the Day: Penguin Run

By | March 1, 2017

Little penguins (Eudyptula minor) live on the southeast coast of Australia, one of the global “hot spots” of marine diversity most severely affected by global warming.

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image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

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