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image: Can’t Take the Heat

Can’t Take the Heat

By | October 10, 2014

Warming waters will cause many fish species to move from the tropics toward the poles, a study predicts.

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image: Tiny Animals May Drive Motion in the Ocean

Tiny Animals May Drive Motion in the Ocean

By | October 2, 2014

The collective swimming of brine shrimp markedly impacts water currents, a study shows.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Grade-schooler Schools Ecologists

Grade-schooler Schools Ecologists

By | July 23, 2014

A sixth grader’s science project on the salinity tolerance of lionfish inspires an academic researcher to confirm the student’s results, expanding knowledge of an invasive species.

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image: The Mantis Shrimp’s UV View

The Mantis Shrimp’s UV View

By | July 7, 2014

A crustacean’s eyes are tuned to ultraviolet frequencies with the help of a biological sunblock molecule.

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image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

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image: Autism-Hormone Link Found

Autism-Hormone Link Found

By | June 4, 2014

A study documents boys with autism who were exposed to elevated levels of testosterone, cortisol, and other hormones in utero.

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image: Methane Overload for Marine Microbes

Methane Overload for Marine Microbes

By | May 12, 2014

Latest analysis of microbial activities in the Gulf of Mexico suggests that gas-rich deepwater plumes following the Deepwater Horizon oil well blowout may have overwhelmed methane-oxidizing bacterial species.

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