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image: Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised

Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised

By | July 25, 2016

The partnering of an alga and a fungus to make lichen may be only two-thirds of the equation.

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image: Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

Man and Bird Chat While Honey Hunting

By | July 25, 2016

A study suggests that humans and avians in sub-Saharan Africa communicate to find and mutually benefit from the sweet booty.

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More than half of the world’s land may have passed the threshold that threatens long-term sustainable development, researchers report.

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image: Amazonian Reef

Amazonian Reef

By | July 1, 2016

See footage from the expedition that discovered a coral reef hiding beneath the massive muddy plume at the mouth of the Amazon River.

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image: Archaea’s Role in Carbon Cycle

Archaea’s Role in Carbon Cycle

By | July 1, 2016

Bathyarchaeota undergo acetogenesis, generating organic carbon below the seafloor.

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image: First Photo of Intact Giant Squid, 1874

First Photo of Intact Giant Squid, 1874

By | July 1, 2016

Moses Harvey’s photograph brought the mysterious creature out of legend and into science.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Images of the Day from the-scientist.com

Images of the Day from the-scientist.com

By | July 1, 2016

From the Earth's oceans

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image: Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

By | July 1, 2016

The University of St. Andrews behavioral ecologist studies the social structures and behaviors of whales and dolphins, recording and analyzing their acoustic communications.

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image: Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

By | July 1, 2016

Watching the decomposition of pig carcasses anchored to the seafloor is helping forensic researchers understand what to expect of human remains dumped in the ocean.

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