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» China and developmental biology

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image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Fertility Treatment Fallout

Fertility Treatment Fallout

By | January 1, 2015

Mouse offspring conceived by in vitro fertilization are metabolically different from naturally conceived mice.

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image: NIH Study Canceled

NIH Study Canceled

By | December 15, 2014

The National Institutes of Health shutters its initiative to track the health of 100,000 children through adulthood.

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image: Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

Mother’s Microbes Protect Baby’s Brain

By | November 19, 2014

Bacteria in the gut of a pregnant mouse strengthen the blood-brain barrier of her developing fetus.

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image: Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

Stems Cells Ushered into Embryonic Development

By | November 7, 2014

The right mix of mouse embryonic stem cells in a dish will start forming early embryonic patterns, according to two studies.

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image: China Shakes Up Research Funding

China Shakes Up Research Funding

By | October 27, 2014

Corruption and waste prompt officials to announce that by 2017, the main competitive, federal science funding programs will be eliminated, replaced by a uniform platform.

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image: Chinese Cloning Researcher Arrested

Chinese Cloning Researcher Arrested

By | October 14, 2014

Anticorruption officials have charged a professor at China Agricultural University with misusing government research funds.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Prehistoric Critters Change View of Mammal Evolution

Prehistoric Critters Change View of Mammal Evolution

By | September 12, 2014

Three extinct squirrel-like species were identified from Jurassic-era fossils in China.

1 Comment

image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

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