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image: Website Tracks Happiness Using Twitter

Website Tracks Happiness Using Twitter

By | May 1, 2013

The day of the Boston Marathon bombings scored lower on the index than any other day since measurements began nearly 5 years ago.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | May 1, 2013

May 2013's selection of notable quotes

3 Comments

image: Viruses on the Brain

Viruses on the Brain

By | May 1, 2013

Viral infections of the central nervous system may trigger cytokines that induce seizures.

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image: Can CO2 Help Grow Rainforests?

Can CO2 Help Grow Rainforests?

By | April 24, 2013

Researchers in the Amazon are measuring how much carbon dioxide fertilizes the rainforest.

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image: Visual Consciousness Emerges

Visual Consciousness Emerges

By | April 22, 2013

A new study of brain activity patterns suggests that babies as young as 5 months old have the neural mechanisms to register that they’ve seen a face.  

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image: Measuring Consciousness

Measuring Consciousness

By | April 17, 2013

Researchers are identifying distinctive brain activity patterns that can be used to monitor patients under anesthesia and assess consciousness in “vegetative” patients.

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image: Bad Stats Plague Neuroscience

Bad Stats Plague Neuroscience

By | April 16, 2013

A new study blames the unreliable nature of some research in the field on underpowered statistical analyses.

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image: Beer Tastes Intoxicating

Beer Tastes Intoxicating

By | April 15, 2013

Just the flavor of beer is enough to boost dopamine in brain areas related to reward—especially in men with alcoholic relatives.

4 Comments

image: A Link Between Autism and Cannabinoids

A Link Between Autism and Cannabinoids

By | April 11, 2013

Mutations tied to autism in mice lead to deficits in the signaling pathway activated by marijuana.

8 Comments

image: Mysterious Sea Lion Stranding Continues

Mysterious Sea Lion Stranding Continues

By | April 8, 2013

Scientists are stumped as to why hundreds of starved pups have been washing up on the California shore.

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