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» twitter, neuroscience and evolution

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image: On The Origin of Flowers

On The Origin of Flowers

By | December 19, 2013

The genome of Amborella trichopoda—the sister species of all flowering plants—provides clues about this group’s rise to power.

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image: NIH Calls for BRAIN Proposals

NIH Calls for BRAIN Proposals

By | December 19, 2013

The National Institutes of Health has outlined the types of projects it intends to fund through the federal BRAIN Initiative, and is requesting applications.

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image: The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

The Mating Habits of Early Hominins

By | December 18, 2013

A newly sequenced Neanderthal genome provides insight into the sex lives of human ancestors.

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image: Herding Cats

Herding Cats

By | December 17, 2013

Examination of bones found in a Chinese village suggests that domesticated felines lived side-by-side with humans 5,300 years ago.

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image: Enzyme Checks Neuronal Growth

Enzyme Checks Neuronal Growth

By | December 17, 2013

A microtubule-severing enzyme curbs the regeneration of damaged nerve cells.

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image: How Bacteria Evade the Immune System

How Bacteria Evade the Immune System

By | December 12, 2013

Escherichia coli can quickly evolve to resist engulfment by macrophages, scientists have found.

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image: A New Basal Animal

A New Basal Animal

By | December 12, 2013

Comb jellies take their place on the oldest branch of the animal family tree.  

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image: Tweet Talk

Tweet Talk

By | December 11, 2013

A new analysis finds is no link between a researcher’s citations and Twitter mentions of her scientific research.

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image: Wolfish Social Skills

Wolfish Social Skills

By | December 4, 2013

According to a new study, wolves can learn from humans.

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image: Bipedal Beginnings

Bipedal Beginnings

By | December 4, 2013

Re-examination of a thigh bone from one of the earliest putative hominins could impact scientists’ understanding of the origins of human bipedalism, a study suggests.

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