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Contributors

By | October 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Get a Whiff of This

Get a Whiff of This

By | October 1, 2013

An issue devoted to the latest research on how smells lead to actions

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image: Scents in a Flash

Scents in a Flash

By | October 1, 2013

The modern technique of optogenetics stimulates the complex act of smelling with a simple flash of light.

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image: Ballet Brain

Ballet Brain

By | September 30, 2013

The areas corresponding to balance in the brains of trained ballet dancers differ from those of non-dancers.

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image: Nobel Laureate Dies

Nobel Laureate Dies

By | September 26, 2013

David Hubel, who helped revolutionize the understanding of visual information processing, has passed away at age 87.

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image: New Organelle: The Tannosome

New Organelle: The Tannosome

By | September 23, 2013

Researchers identify a structure in plants responsible for the production of tannins.

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image: Celebrated Neuroscientist Dies

Celebrated Neuroscientist Dies

By | September 23, 2013

Candace Pert, who helped discover opioid receptors, has passed away at age 67.

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image: Inducing Pluripotency Every Time

Inducing Pluripotency Every Time

By | September 18, 2013

By removing a single gene, adult cells can be reprogrammed into a stem-like state with nearly 100 percent efficiency.

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image: Making a Case for Social Media

Making a Case for Social Media

By | September 11, 2013

Twitter can help scientists build networks, develop ideas, and spread their work, report says.

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image: Fly-Wrangling and Undesirable Snacks

Fly-Wrangling and Undesirable Snacks

By | September 3, 2013

A humorous Twitter hashtag helps paint a picture of what science initiation rituals might look like.

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