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image: Poor Little Devils

Poor Little Devils

By | November 1, 2014

See the devastating infectious cancer that may drive the Tasmanian Devil to extinction.

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image: Science Gone Social

Science Gone Social

By , , , , and | October 1, 2014

Scientists are beginning to embrace social media as a viable means of communicating with public audiences.

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image: Speaking of Vision Science

Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Setting the Record Straight

Setting the Record Straight

By | October 1, 2014

Scientists are taking to social media to challenge weak research, share replication attempts in real time, and counteract hype. Will this online discourse enrich the scientific process?

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image: Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

Epigenetics of Trained Innate Immunity

By | September 25, 2014

Documenting the epigenetic landscape of human innate immune cells reveals pathways essential for training macrophages.

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

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image: How Long Is Too Long?

How Long Is Too Long?

By | August 27, 2014

Readers discuss the varied amounts of time they’ve waited for journals to respond to or act on their concerns regarding published papers.

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image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Introducing the “K Index”

Introducing the “K Index”

By | July 30, 2014

The Kardashian Index reflects how a scientist’s social media presence stacks up against her citation record.

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image: Done with Immunosuppressants

Done with Immunosuppressants

By | July 3, 2014

Adult sickle-cell patients have safely stopped taking their immunosuppressant medication thanks to a new type of blood stem-cell transplant.

2 Comments

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