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image: Keeping Up with Climate Change

Keeping Up with Climate Change

By | July 24, 2013

In order to adapt to this century’s changing temperatures, vertebrates will need to evolve much faster than in previous eras.

3 Comments

image: A Big-Nosed Horn-Faced Dino

A Big-Nosed Horn-Faced Dino

By | July 18, 2013

The discovery of a new species of horned dinosaur supports the idea that similar but separate species evolved on the same landmass thanks to a natural barrier.  

1 Comment

image: Week in Review, July 1–5

Week in Review, July 1–5

By | July 5, 2013

Fraudulent journal editor?; fat cells detect temp, generate heat; the importance of social media in science communication; functional livers from iPSCs; antibiotics damage mitochondria

0 Comments

image: Opinion: Tweeting to the Top

Opinion: Tweeting to the Top

By | July 2, 2013

The lines between scholarly and traditional forms of popular communication are fading, and scientists need to take advantage.

0 Comments

image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

7 Comments

image: Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

By | June 26, 2013

By sequencing the genome of a 700,000-year-old horse, researchers have pushed back the time of DNA survival by almost an order of magnitude.

3 Comments

image: Darwin Cleared of Plagiarism

Darwin Cleared of Plagiarism

By | June 26, 2013

A new book by an evolution historian asserts that Darwin and Wallace developed their theories of evolution independently.

1 Comment

image: Week in Review, June 17–21

Week in Review, June 17–21

By | June 21, 2013

On the gene patent decision; a high-res human brain model; bats’ influence on moths mating calls; toxicants threaten brain health; platelet-driven immunity

0 Comments

image: Nailing Regeneration

Nailing Regeneration

By | June 12, 2013

Researchers identify the signaling program that enables finger and toenail stem cells to direct digit regeneration after amputation.

0 Comments

image: Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

Why Many Birds Don’t Have Penises

By | June 7, 2013

In avian species, a gene induces programmed cell death during development in the area where a phallus would otherwise grow.

1 Comment

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