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image: The Sweet Sounds of Spider Silk

The Sweet Sounds of Spider Silk

By | March 7, 2012

A researcher spins spider silk into violin strings.

4 Comments

image: Antarctic Invasion

Antarctic Invasion

By | March 5, 2012

Invasive species threaten the most pristine place on Earth.

4 Comments

Contributors

March 1, 2012

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2012 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: One Year On

One Year On

By | March 1, 2012

Some thoughts about the ecological fallout from Fukushima

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image: Climate Conflict of Interest?

Climate Conflict of Interest?

By | February 24, 2012

Greenpeace flags researchers' payments from a climate change skeptic organization.

0 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | February 21, 2012

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

2 Comments

image: Boozing for Better Health

Boozing for Better Health

By | February 16, 2012

Fruit flies consume alcohol to kill off parasites.

12 Comments

image: Social Media for Epidemiology?

Social Media for Epidemiology?

By | February 14, 2012

Epidemiologists consider how social media could be harnessed to predict disease outbreaks.

4 Comments

image: Fukushima Birds Affected

Fukushima Birds Affected

By | February 9, 2012

Radiation in Fukushima Prefecture is reducing bird populations less than 1 year since the nuclear disaster.

0 Comments

image: Satellites Spy on Fish Farms

Satellites Spy on Fish Farms

By | February 8, 2012

Scientists use Google Earth to fact check official reports of fish farming in the Mediterranean.

15 Comments

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