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Synaptic connections and a new neuron type emerge in high-res images, which hold promise for mapping the complete connectome.

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Mitochondrial DNA polymerase is necessary for the destruction of paternal mtDNA in fruit fly sperm, scientists show.

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image: Scientists Solve Giant Sperm Paradox

Scientists Solve Giant Sperm Paradox

By | May 26, 2016

A study reveals why some male fruit flies produce sex cells that are 20 times the length of their bodies.

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image: Picturing Inheritance, 1916

Picturing Inheritance, 1916

By | May 1, 2016

This year marks the centennial of Calvin Bridges’s description of nondisjunction as proof that chromosomes are vehicles for inheritance.

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image: Fruit-Fly Neurons in Action

Fruit-Fly Neurons in Action

By | August 12, 2015

Researchers visualize the complete nervous system of a Drosophila melanogaster larva at nearly single-neuron resolution.

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image: Insulin Interference Triggers Cancer-Linked Cachexia

Insulin Interference Triggers Cancer-Linked Cachexia

By | April 6, 2015

A tumor-secreted protein interferes with insulin signaling to cause cancer-linked muscle wasting in fruit flies. 

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image: Animal Tracker

Animal Tracker

By | June 3, 2014

A program developed by animal behavior researchers automatically tracks individuals in a group, like fish in a school or ants in a colony.

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | January 29, 2014

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Frisky Fruit Flies

Frisky Fruit Flies

By | November 5, 2013

Researchers show that Drosophila females upregulate an immune gene for protection against sexually transmitted infections before copulation.

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image: Fixing Fly Forgetfulness

Fixing Fly Forgetfulness

By | September 3, 2013

Polyamines help fruit flies retain memories as they age.

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