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image: To Attract Pollinators, Flower Mimics Wounded Bee

To Attract Pollinators, Flower Mimics Wounded Bee

By | October 7, 2016

Umbrella flowers lure in flies by mimicking the alarm signals produced by the flies’ preferred prey.

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image: Wired Flower

Wired Flower

By | November 24, 2015

Researchers use a conducting polymer to construct circuits inside plant cuttings in a proof-of-concept study.

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image: Bumblebee Tongues Growing Shorter

Bumblebee Tongues Growing Shorter

By | September 28, 2015

Two alpine bee species have evolved shorter tongues, adapting to floral declines related to climate change.

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image: The Structure of Flowers

The Structure of Flowers

By | April 4, 2014

Architecture student-turned-artist Macato Murayama creates beautiful images inspired by the intricate anatomy of flowers.

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image: Plants Without Plastid Genomes

Plants Without Plastid Genomes

By | February 28, 2014

Two independent teams point to different plants that may have lost their plastid genomes.

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image: On The Origin of Flowers

On The Origin of Flowers

By | December 19, 2013

The genome of Amborella trichopoda—the sister species of all flowering plants—provides clues about this group’s rise to power.

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image: Buzzed Honeybees

Buzzed Honeybees

By | March 11, 2013

The pollinators are more likely to recall flowers that offer them a caffeine reward.

2 Comments

image: Building Flowers

Building Flowers

By | February 16, 2012

An architecture graduate constructs intricate botanical illustrations using the computer graphics programs intended to design buildings.

6 Comments

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