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» H5N1 and ecology

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image: Colony Collapse from Pesticides?

Colony Collapse from Pesticides?

By | April 9, 2012

Yet another study demonstrates that how pesticides might be related to the collapse of wild bee colonies.

4 Comments

image: Poisonous Shrooms Battle Cancer

Poisonous Shrooms Battle Cancer

By | April 4, 2012

A deadly mushroom toxin shrinks pancreatic tumors in mice.

2 Comments

image: Ants Share Pathogens for Immunity

Ants Share Pathogens for Immunity

By | April 3, 2012

A new study shows that grooming by ants promotes colony-wide resistance to fungal infections by transferring small amounts of pathogen to nestmates.

8 Comments

image: Bird Flu Papers to Publish

Bird Flu Papers to Publish

By | April 2, 2012

Biosecurity board recommends publication of data detailing transmissibility of H5N1 avian influenza.

4 Comments

image: Agents Provocateurs

Agents Provocateurs

By | April 1, 2012

Asking pointed questions is a key part of the scientific process.

3 Comments

image: Deliberating Over Danger

Deliberating Over Danger

By | April 1, 2012

The creation of H5N1 bird flu strains that are transmissible between mammals has thrown the scientific community into a heated debate about whether such research should be allowed and how it should be regulated.

16 Comments

image: Whirlpool Bistros

Whirlpool Bistros

By | April 1, 2012

Fish adapt to feed for months along the entire depth of massive oceanic whirlpools that are rich in nutrients and plankton.

0 Comments

image: Risky Research Review

Risky Research Review

By | March 30, 2012

A new policy will require federal agencies to perform a careful review of research involving 15 pathogens and toxins that could be used for bioterrorism, including H5N1.

2 Comments

image: Pesticide Problems for Bees

Pesticide Problems for Bees

By | March 30, 2012

Bees exposed to neonicotinoids, a widely-used class of pesticide, navigate poorly and produce fewer queens, suggesting a role for neonicotinoids in colony collapse.

0 Comments

image: More Maternal Effort Means More Robust Offspring

More Maternal Effort Means More Robust Offspring

By | March 28, 2012

House wrens forced to invest extra resources in their offspring produced bigger sons and daughters with stronger immune systems.

8 Comments

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