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» H5N1 and ecology

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image: Microbial Awakening

Microbial Awakening

By | November 1, 2012

Successive awakening of soil microbes drives a huge pulse of CO2 following the first rain after a dry summer.

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image: The Birthday Conference

The Birthday Conference

By | November 1, 2012

Snapshots from an annual meeting that celebrates the birth of a prominent biologist

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image: A Celebrated Symposium

A Celebrated Symposium

By | November 1, 2012

A conference, started 10 years ago partly as a disease ecologist’s birthday party, has become one of the most valued meetings in the field.  

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image: Opinion: Fishy Deaths

Opinion: Fishy Deaths

By | October 29, 2012

Record fish die-offs in the Midwest call for a fresh look at how humans are disrupting the planet’s essential water cycle.

1 Comment

image: Natural-Born Doctors

Natural-Born Doctors

By | October 23, 2012

Bees, sheep, and chimps are just a few of the animals known to self-medicate. Can they teach us about maintaining our own health?

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image: Opinion: Controlling Invasion

Opinion: Controlling Invasion

By | October 15, 2012

Remote sensing helps control an invasive giant weed that threatens ecosystems and border security.

2 Comments

image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | October 9, 2012

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: Beard Beer

Beard Beer

By | October 4, 2012

A brewmaster is creating a signature concoction using yeast found in his facial hair.

2 Comments

image: Death Match

Death Match

By | October 1, 2012

Cockfighting and other cultural practices in Southeast Asia could greatly aid the spread of deadly diseases like bird flu.

1 Comment

image: Evolving Dependence

Evolving Dependence

By | September 27, 2012

Scientists unravel the confusing molecular biology behind a fruit fly’s reliance on a single type of cactus.

1 Comment

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