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Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

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image: Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

Ravenous Invasive Worm Now in U.S.

By | June 25, 2015

Researchers have found the New Guinea flatworm, one of the world’s most invasive species, in Florida, putting native ecosystems at serious risk.

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image: Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

Climate Change Speeds Extinctions

By | May 3, 2015

Species die-offs are expected to accelerate as greenhouse gases accumulate, according to a meta-analysis.

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image: Follow the Funding

Follow the Funding

By | May 1, 2015

In times of budget belt-tightening at the federal level, life-science researchers can keep their work supported through private sources.  

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image: Bees Drawn to Pesticides

Bees Drawn to Pesticides

By | April 24, 2015

One study shows the insects prefer food laced with pesticides, while another adds to the evidence that the chemicals are harmful to some pollinators.

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image: Study: Peer Review Predicts Success

Study: Peer Review Predicts Success

By | April 23, 2015

Scientists who evaluate National Institutes of Health grant applications often identify the projects that will have the biggest scientific impact, according to an analysis.

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image: Science at a Premium

Science at a Premium

By | March 15, 2015

Although research supplies are exempted from Argentina’s import restrictions, regulations for bringing materials into the country are hampering science nonetheless.

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Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2015

Evolving Ourselves, The Man Who Touched His Own Heart, Bats, and The Invaders

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image: Taming Bushmeat

Taming Bushmeat

By | January 1, 2015

Chinese farmers’ efforts at rearing wild animals may benefit conservation and reduce human health risks.

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image: Bats Make a Comeback

Bats Make a Comeback

By | December 22, 2014

Citizen-scientist data obtained through the U.K.’s National Bat Monitoring Programme show that populations of 10 bat species have stabilized or are growing.

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