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image: MERS Sequence Analysis

MERS Sequence Analysis

By | June 11, 2015

The strain of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus currently circulating in South Korea is highly similar to the one in the pathogen’s namesake region.

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image: MERS Update

MERS Update

By | June 4, 2015

Through contact tracing, health officials confirm additional cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome in South Korea. 

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image: The Roots of Schizophrenia

The Roots of Schizophrenia

By | June 4, 2015

Researchers link disease-associated mutations to excitatory and inhibitory signaling in the brain.

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image: Brain Drain

Brain Drain

By | June 1, 2015

The brain contains lymphatic vessels similar to those found elsewhere in the body, a mouse study shows.

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image: MERS-CoV in South Korea, China

MERS-CoV in South Korea, China

By | June 1, 2015

The World Health Organization reports on newly confirmed cases of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus infections in the two countries, as well as in Qatar and Saudi Arabia.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: New Legs to Stand On

New Legs to Stand On

By | June 1, 2015

Reconstructing the past using ancient DNA

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image: Lost Memories Reactivated in Mice

Lost Memories Reactivated in Mice

By | May 29, 2015

Using optogenetics, researchers excite selected neurons to reinstate a fear memory that had been blocked.

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image: Gene Linked to Pain Insensitivity

Gene Linked to Pain Insensitivity

By | May 27, 2015

People with a congenital disorder that makes them unable to feel pain have mutations in a histone-modifying gene. 

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image: WHO OKs Plan to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

WHO OKs Plan to Fight Antibiotic Resistance

By | May 27, 2015

World Health Organization officials endorse a global strategy to combat the spread of antibiotic resistance.

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