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Notable Science Quotes

By | July 1, 2016

Human Genome Project-Write; viruses are alpha predators; Zika and the Olympics

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Ancient DNA research suggests that there were two independent agricultural revolutions more than 10,000 years ago.

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World Health Organization concludes the events are unlikely to worsen the viral outbreak.

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New recommendation from the World Health Organization could affect millions of people across Latin America and the Caribbean.

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The World Health Organization now recommends that people who visit areas with Zika virus transmission abstain from or have only protected sex for eight weeks.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Wondrous Truths</em>

Book Excerpt from Wondrous Truths

By | June 1, 2016

In Chapter 2 author J.D. Trout highlights the dividing line between truth and scientific “fact.”

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Hot Off the Presses

By | June 1, 2016

Beyond Biocentrism, The Sting of the Wild, The Birth of Anthropocene, and Ordinarily Well

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | June 1, 2016

14-day-old embryos, prioritizing biodiversity, and more

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Start Making Sense

By | June 1, 2016

Scientific progress is only achieved when humans' innate sense of understanding is validated by objective reality.

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image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | May 13, 2016

US government contemplates public health funding; World Health Organization advises summer Olympics attendees

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