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The World Health Organization now recommends that people who visit areas with Zika virus transmission abstain from or have only protected sex for eight weeks.


image: Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

Research at Micro- and Nanoscales

By | June 1, 2016

From whole cells to genes, closer examination continues to surprise.  

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image: Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

Editing Genomes to Record Cellular Histories

By | May 26, 2016

Researchers harness the power of genome editing to track cell lineages throughout zebrafish development.


image: Zika Update

Zika Update

By | May 13, 2016

US government contemplates public health funding; World Health Organization advises summer Olympics attendees


image: Embryo Watch

Embryo Watch

By | May 5, 2016

A new culture system allows researchers to track the development of human embryos in vitro for nearly two weeks. 

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image: Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

Cellular Pruning Follows Adult Neurogenesis

By | May 2, 2016

Newly formed neurons in the adult mouse brain oversprout and get cut back.


image: A Gut Feeling

A Gut Feeling

By | April 1, 2016

See profilee Hans Clevers discuss his work with stem cells and cancer in the small intestine.


image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: WHO: Ebola Emergency Over

WHO: Ebola Emergency Over

By | March 30, 2016

While additional flare-ups may occur, the World Health Organization says countries now “have the capacity to respond rapidly to new virus emergences.”


image: WHO: Ebola Confirmed in Guinea

WHO: Ebola Confirmed in Guinea

By | March 21, 2016

After declaring the end of an Ebola flare-up in Sierra Leone, the World Health Organization confirms two cases in Guinea. 


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