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Contributors

By | April 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Parallel Plagues

Parallel Plagues

By | April 1, 2016

Like cancer, ecological scourges result from the breakdown of regulatory processes, and may be treated with similar logic.

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image: WHO: Ebola Emergency Over

WHO: Ebola Emergency Over

By | March 30, 2016

While additional flare-ups may occur, the World Health Organization says countries now “have the capacity to respond rapidly to new virus emergences.”

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image: WHO: Ebola Confirmed in Guinea

WHO: Ebola Confirmed in Guinea

By | March 21, 2016

After declaring the end of an Ebola flare-up in Sierra Leone, the World Health Organization confirms two cases in Guinea. 

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A study suggests bats in Asia could have genes that protect them from the fungal infection that is decimating bat populations in North America.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Keep Off the Grass

Keep Off the Grass

By | February 1, 2016

Ecologists focused on grasslands urge policymakers to keep forestation efforts in check.

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image: Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

Jason Holliday: Tree Tracker

By | February 1, 2016

Associate Professor, Virginia Tech, Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation. Age: 37

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image: Guinea Declared Free of Ebola

Guinea Declared Free of Ebola

By | December 29, 2015

Forty-two days have passed since the last confirmed Ebola patient in the country tested negative for a second time, the World Health Organization says.

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image: Global Food-Related Disease Estimate

Global Food-Related Disease Estimate

By | December 7, 2015

More than 400,000 people—including 125,000 children—die from foodborne illness every year, according to the World Health Organization.

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