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More than half of the world’s land may have passed the threshold that threatens long-term sustainable development, researchers report.

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image: Hot Off the Presses

Hot Off the Presses

By | July 1, 2016

The Scientist reviews Serendipity, Complexity, The Human Superorgasism, and Love and Ruin

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image: Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

By | July 1, 2016

The University of St. Andrews behavioral ecologist studies the social structures and behaviors of whales and dolphins, recording and analyzing their acoustic communications.

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image: Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

By | July 1, 2016

Watching the decomposition of pig carcasses anchored to the seafloor is helping forensic researchers understand what to expect of human remains dumped in the ocean.

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image: Well-Brined Pork

Well-Brined Pork

By | July 1, 2016

Watch what happens when marine organisms have their way with a sunken pig carcass.

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image: Identifying Resilient Reefs

Identifying Resilient Reefs

By | June 16, 2016

Researchers identify areas where marine ecosystems are faring better or worse than predicted in hopes of saving the world’s corals.

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image: Prominent Ecologist Dies

Prominent Ecologist Dies

By | June 16, 2016

Bob Paine, best known for introducing the idea of “keystone species,” has passed away at age 83.

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World Health Organization concludes the events are unlikely to worsen the viral outbreak.

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New recommendation from the World Health Organization could affect millions of people across Latin America and the Caribbean.

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The World Health Organization now recommends that people who visit areas with Zika virus transmission abstain from or have only protected sex for eight weeks.

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