The Scientist

» activism and immunology

Most Recent

image: Infographic: Antibody Cancer Therapy

Infographic: Antibody Cancer Therapy

By | April 1, 2017

An experimental technique removes T cells that aid in vitro tumor growth.

3 Comments

image: Infographic: Targeting Cancer Antigens

Infographic: Targeting Cancer Antigens

By | April 1, 2017

Neoantigens may serve as valuable targets for new immunotherapies.

0 Comments

image: Targeting Tregs Halts Cancer’s Immune Helpers

Targeting Tregs Halts Cancer’s Immune Helpers

By | April 1, 2017

New monoclonal antibodies kill both cancer-promoting immunosuppressive cells and tumor cells in culture.

0 Comments

image: Anti-Flavivirus Antibodies Enhance Zika Infection in Mice

Anti-Flavivirus Antibodies Enhance Zika Infection in Mice

By | March 30, 2017

Researchers report evidence of antibody-dependent enhancement in a Zika-infected, immunocompromised mouse model.

0 Comments

image: Experimental MERS Treatments Target Host Cell Receptor

Experimental MERS Treatments Target Host Cell Receptor

By | March 30, 2017

Researchers are searching for ways to prevent the coronavirus from attaching to DPP-4 receptors, blocking it from invading and replicating within host cells.

0 Comments

image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Memphis

Q&A: Marching for Science in Memphis

By | March 22, 2017

A conversation with activist and undergraduate student Sydney Bryant

1 Comment

image: Opinion: After We March

Opinion: After We March

By | March 16, 2017

How to become—and stay—involved in science policy 

4 Comments

image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Los Angeles

Q&A: Marching for Science in Los Angeles

By | March 3, 2017

A conversation with graduate student Alex Bradley

3 Comments

image: Marching for Science in San Diego

Marching for Science in San Diego

By | February 27, 2017

A conversation with postdoc Robert Cooper, entrepreneur Alex Eyman, and lawyer Melissa Slawson

3 Comments

AAAS and more than 25 scientific societies throw their support behind the event.

14 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Grass Routes
    Features Grass Routes

    Researchers are discovering a suite of new locations and functions of endocannabinoid receptors that play roles in sickness and in health.

  3. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  4. Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study
AAAS