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image: Targeting Tregs Halts Cancer’s Immune Helpers

Targeting Tregs Halts Cancer’s Immune Helpers

By | April 1, 2017

New monoclonal antibodies kill both cancer-promoting immunosuppressive cells and tumor cells in culture.

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image: Anti-Flavivirus Antibodies Enhance Zika Infection in Mice

Anti-Flavivirus Antibodies Enhance Zika Infection in Mice

By | March 30, 2017

Researchers report evidence of antibody-dependent enhancement in a Zika-infected, immunocompromised mouse model.

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image: Experimental MERS Treatments Target Host Cell Receptor

Experimental MERS Treatments Target Host Cell Receptor

By | March 30, 2017

Researchers are searching for ways to prevent the coronavirus from attaching to DPP-4 receptors, blocking it from invading and replicating within host cells.

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image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Memphis

Q&A: Marching for Science in Memphis

By | March 22, 2017

A conversation with activist and undergraduate student Sydney Bryant

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image: Opinion: After We March

Opinion: After We March

By | March 16, 2017

How to become—and stay—involved in science policy 

4 Comments

image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Los Angeles

Q&A: Marching for Science in Los Angeles

By | March 3, 2017

A conversation with graduate student Alex Bradley

3 Comments

image: Marching for Science in San Diego

Marching for Science in San Diego

By | February 27, 2017

A conversation with postdoc Robert Cooper, entrepreneur Alex Eyman, and lawyer Melissa Slawson

3 Comments

AAAS and more than 25 scientific societies throw their support behind the event.

14 Comments

image: Science Policy: Anxiety and Resolve at AAAS Conference

Science Policy: Anxiety and Resolve at AAAS Conference

By | February 21, 2017

A panel discussion on channeling science into policy served as a forum for debating the role of scientists under the current administration. 

4 Comments

image: Marching for Science, from Berlin to Sydney

Marching for Science, from Berlin to Sydney

By | February 20, 2017

Satellite marches across the globe aim to stand in solidarity with US scientists and highlight issues in their home countries. 

5 Comments

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