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image: Opinion: Should Scientists Engage in Activism?

Opinion: Should Scientists Engage in Activism?

By | February 7, 2017

Scientists who accept funding with the tacit agreement that they keep their mouths shut about the government are far more threatening to an independent academy than those who speak their minds.

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image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Anchorage

Q&A: Marching for Science in Anchorage

By | February 6, 2017

A conversation with ecologist Bryan Box

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image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Cleveland

Q&A: Marching for Science in Cleveland

By | February 2, 2017

A conversation with evolutionary biologist Patricia Princehouse

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image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Eugene

Q&A: Marching for Science in Eugene

By | February 2, 2017

A conversation with writer and geologist Ruby McConnell 

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image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Buffalo

Q&A: Marching for Science in Buffalo

By | February 1, 2017

A conversation with pharmacology PhD student Alexandria Trujillo and undergraduate research assistant Jonathan Plaza

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image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Atlanta

Q&A: Marching for Science in Atlanta

By | January 30, 2017

A conversation with Atlanta Science Tavern Executive Director Marc Merlin

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image: Unique Antibodies Open Path Toward New HIV Vaccines

Unique Antibodies Open Path Toward New HIV Vaccines

By | January 27, 2017

A family of broadly neutralizing antibodies from a chronically infected donor provides a schematic for designing vaccines and treatments that target multiple strains of the virus.

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image: Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

Mouse Immunology Paper Retracted

By | December 16, 2016

A finding of misconduct spurs the retraction of a Science paper claiming to have identified a protein in mice that boosted immunity to both viruses and cancer.

1 Comment

image: Naive T Cells Find Homes in Lymphoid Tissue

Naive T Cells Find Homes in Lymphoid Tissue

By | December 2, 2016

The human lymph nodes and spleen maintain unique, compartmentalized sets of naive T cells well into old age.

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image: Low Social Status May Weaken Immune System in Monkeys

Low Social Status May Weaken Immune System in Monkeys

By | November 29, 2016

Life at the bottom of the pecking order ramps up inflammation, according to new research, an effect that appears to be reversible.

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