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image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Anchorage

Q&A: Marching for Science in Anchorage

By | February 6, 2017

A conversation with ecologist Bryan Box

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image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Cleveland

Q&A: Marching for Science in Cleveland

By | February 2, 2017

A conversation with evolutionary biologist Patricia Princehouse

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image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Eugene

Q&A: Marching for Science in Eugene

By | February 2, 2017

A conversation with writer and geologist Ruby McConnell 

1 Comment

image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Buffalo

Q&A: Marching for Science in Buffalo

By | February 1, 2017

A conversation with pharmacology PhD student Alexandria Trujillo and undergraduate research assistant Jonathan Plaza

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image: Cannibalism: Not That Weird

Cannibalism: Not That Weird

By | February 1, 2017

Eating members of your own species might turn the stomach of the average human, but some animal species make a habit of dining on their own.

5 Comments

image: Q&A: Marching for Science in Atlanta

Q&A: Marching for Science in Atlanta

By | January 30, 2017

A conversation with Atlanta Science Tavern Executive Director Marc Merlin

1 Comment

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Testosterone Rex</em>

Book Excerpt from Testosterone Rex

By | January 1, 2017

In Chapter 6, “The Hormonal Essence of the T-Rex?” author Cordelia Fine considers the biological dogma that testes, and the powerful hormones they exude, are the root of all sexual inequality.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | January 1, 2017

Science under Trump, gene drive, medical marijuana, and more

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image: Speaking of Science: 2016

Speaking of Science: 2016

By | December 19, 2016

Selected quotes from an eventful year

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image: Trumping Science: Part II

Trumping Science: Part II

By | December 6, 2016

As Inauguration Day nears, scientists and science advocates are voicing their unease with the Trump Administration’s potential effects on research.

2 Comments

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