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image: Mining the Outliers

Mining the Outliers

By | April 1, 2015

Even when a clinical trial fails, some patients improve. What can researchers learn from these exceptional responders?

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image: Mauro Costa-Mattioli: Memory’s Puppeteer

Mauro Costa-Mattioli: Memory’s Puppeteer

By | February 1, 2015

Associate Professor, Department of Neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine. Age: 39

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image: Synaptic Pruning Improves Autism in Mice

Synaptic Pruning Improves Autism in Mice

By | August 25, 2014

Fixing impaired pruning and autophagy signaling in neurons eases the symptoms of autism in a mouse model of the disorder.

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image: Mutant Mice Live Longer

Mutant Mice Live Longer

By | August 29, 2013

Reducing the levels of mTOR in rodents extends their lifespan by about 20 percent, though not without consequences.

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image: Blocking Memories to Treat Alcoholism

Blocking Memories to Treat Alcoholism

By | June 25, 2013

Targeting a molecular pathway involved with learning and memory helps rats with a taste for booze wean themselves off of the sauce.

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image: David Sabatini: Demystifying mTOR

David Sabatini: Demystifying mTOR

By | March 1, 2012

Principal Investigator, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research. Associate Professor, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Age: 44

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