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image: Art Through the Nose

Art Through the Nose

By | November 29, 2012

A new show at New York’s Museum of Art and Design celebrates olfaction and the science behind modern perfume making.

3 Comments

image: Opinion: Learning from Transcriptomes

Opinion: Learning from Transcriptomes

By | November 28, 2012

In the largest microbial eukaryote genetic sequencing effort ever attempted, researchers are investigating the transcriptomes of 700 marine algae species.

1 Comment

image: Microbial Life Beneath the Ice

Microbial Life Beneath the Ice

By | November 27, 2012

Researchers uncover a diverse microbial community living beneath 27 meters of ice in Antarctica’s Lake Vida.

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Talking Genomics

Opinion: Talking Genomics

By | November 13, 2012

The crucial importance of language in the debate over the regulation of direct-to-consumer genetic tests

1 Comment

image: Navel Bugs

Navel Bugs

By | November 12, 2012

A new study reveals a large mix of microbes in most human belly buttons.  

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image: Setback for Malaria Vaccine

Setback for Malaria Vaccine

By | November 9, 2012

The malaria vaccine under development by GSK and the PATH initiative only protects about one in three babies, though some researchers say those odds are better than nothing.

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image: Extra Vaccine Halts Mumps Outbreak

Extra Vaccine Halts Mumps Outbreak

By | November 8, 2012

A third dose of the MMR vaccine given during an intense outbreak appears to have provided herd-immunity to control the spread of the disease.

1 Comment

image: Sandy’s Impact on Science

Sandy’s Impact on Science

By | November 5, 2012

More stories surface about how last week’s super storm is affecting research up and down the coast—and how science is fighting back.

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image: Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

Book Excerpt from The Science of Consequences

By | November 1, 2012

In Chapter 2, "Consequences and Evolution: The Cause That Works Backwards," author Susan M. Schneider places evolutionary theory in terms of the science of consequences.

1 Comment

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2012

Spillover, Answers for Aristotle, Who’s in Charge? and Science Set Free

1 Comment

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