The Scientist

» media relations, microbiology and ecology

Most Recent

image: Week in Review, March 18-22

Week in Review, March 18-22

By | March 22, 2013

Venom-based drugs for pain; microbes in the deep ocean; altruistic, suicidal bacteria; a call for open access; clinical sequencing; the newest genomes

0 Comments

image: The Upside of Suicide

The Upside of Suicide

By | March 20, 2013

Researchers show that a bacterium’s self-sacrifice can benefit its community, even when the members are not strongly related.

4 Comments

image: Bridges for UK Water Voles

Bridges for UK Water Voles

By | March 20, 2013

Newly constructed ramps will expand the habitat available to a colony of water voles in London, and similar ramps elsewhere could encourage isolated populations to mix.   

0 Comments

image: Microbes Thrive in Deepest Ocean

Microbes Thrive in Deepest Ocean

By | March 17, 2013

Researchers find remarkably active bacteria in the Mariana Trench, where they live under pressure 1,000 times greater than at the surface.

4 Comments

image: Gov’t Science and the Media

Gov’t Science and the Media

By | March 15, 2013

Federal research agencies, such as the NIH, EPA, and NSF, are improving communication between their scientists and journalists, but most can do better.

1 Comment

image: Life Below the Seabed

Life Below the Seabed

By | March 14, 2013

Rock samples from deep within the Earth’s oceanic crust contain chemosynthetic microbial life.

1 Comment

image: Roller Derby Players Share Germs

Roller Derby Players Share Germs

By | March 14, 2013

Team member and opponents exchange microbes by slamming into each others’ shoulders during the game.

1 Comment

image: Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

By | March 12, 2013

Nanoparticles coated with a toxin found in bee venom can destroy HIV while leaving surrounding cells intact.

2 Comments

image: Native Frogs Beat Invasive Toads

Native Frogs Beat Invasive Toads

By | March 8, 2013

Native Australian frog tadpoles outcompete the tadpoles of the invasive cane toad, suggesting the native frogs could form part of a suburban control program.

0 Comments

image: Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

By | March 7, 2013

A red alga appears to have adapted to extremely hot, acidic environments by collecting genes from bacteria and archaea.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  2. Athletes’ Microbiomes Differ from Nonathletes
  3. Mutation Linked to Longer Life Span in Men
  4. Gut Feeling
    Daily News Gut Feeling

    Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

AAAS