The Scientist

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image: Snobby Scientists

Snobby Scientists

By | March 21, 2013

Does the preference of many scientists to only hear talks from successful institutions limit the reach of innovation?

2 Comments

image: The Upside of Suicide

The Upside of Suicide

By | March 20, 2013

Researchers show that a bacterium’s self-sacrifice can benefit its community, even when the members are not strongly related.

4 Comments

image: Microbes Thrive in Deepest Ocean

Microbes Thrive in Deepest Ocean

By | March 17, 2013

Researchers find remarkably active bacteria in the Mariana Trench, where they live under pressure 1,000 times greater than at the surface.

4 Comments

image: La Bohème: A Portrait of Our Oceans in Peril

La Bohème: A Portrait of Our Oceans in Peril

By | March 15, 2013

The sculptures of Mara G. Haseltine's new exhibition tell a tale of beautiful oceans ravaged by pollution.

0 Comments

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Gov’t Science and the Media

By | March 15, 2013

Federal research agencies, such as the NIH, EPA, and NSF, are improving communication between their scientists and journalists, but most can do better.

1 Comment

image: Love Song for an Ailing Planet

Love Song for an Ailing Planet

By | March 15, 2013

Artist Mara G. Haseltine unveils her latest exhibition of science-inspired sculpture, a melancholy ode to marine plankton set to the music of Puccini.

0 Comments

image: Life Below the Seabed

Life Below the Seabed

By | March 14, 2013

Rock samples from deep within the Earth’s oceanic crust contain chemosynthetic microbial life.

1 Comment

image: Roller Derby Players Share Germs

Roller Derby Players Share Germs

By | March 14, 2013

Team member and opponents exchange microbes by slamming into each others’ shoulders during the game.

1 Comment

image: Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

Bee Venom for HIV Prevention

By | March 12, 2013

Nanoparticles coated with a toxin found in bee venom can destroy HIV while leaving surrounding cells intact.

2 Comments

image: Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

Algae Get Help to Go to Extremes

By | March 7, 2013

A red alga appears to have adapted to extremely hot, acidic environments by collecting genes from bacteria and archaea.

0 Comments

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