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image: Identifying Resilient Reefs

Identifying Resilient Reefs

By | June 16, 2016

Researchers identify areas where marine ecosystems are faring better or worse than predicted in hopes of saving the world’s corals.

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image: Early-Life Microbiome

Early-Life Microbiome

By | June 16, 2016

Analyzing the gut microbiomes of children from birth through toddlerhood, researchers tie compositional changes to birth mode, infant diet, and antibiotic therapy.

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image: Coral Currents

Coral Currents

By | June 1, 2016

Researchers at MIT and the Weizmann Institute of Science discover the ultility of coral cilia in creating water currents that bring food and move molecules around the colonial organisms.

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image: Saving Reefs One Polyp at a Time

Saving Reefs One Polyp at a Time

By | June 1, 2016

Researchers have discovered how to study coral organisms in unprecedented detail by mounting them in specially designed microscope slides.

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image: Students Study Their Own Microbiomes

Students Study Their Own Microbiomes

By | June 1, 2016

Pooping into a petri dish is becoming standard practice as part of some college biology courses.

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image: Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

Gut Bacteria for Insect RNAi

By | June 1, 2016

Lacing insect food with microbes encoding double-stranded RNAs can suppress insect gene expression.

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image: Antibiotic Affects Cow Dung

Antibiotic Affects Cow Dung

By | May 25, 2016

Researchers assess some of the downstream effects of treating livestock with a broad-spectrum antibiotic.

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Post-publication peer review prompts the authors to clarify the ages of mice used in their experiments and share additional data.

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image: Narrow-Spectrum Antibiotic Could Spare the Microbiome

Narrow-Spectrum Antibiotic Could Spare the Microbiome

By | May 9, 2016

A drug that singles out Staphylococcus aureus leaves gut-dwelling microbiota largely intact, a mouse study shows.

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image: Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

Most Gut Microbes Can Be Cultured

By | May 4, 2016

Contrary to the popular thought that many species are “unculturable,” the majority of bacteria known to populate the human gut can be grown in the lab, scientists show.

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