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image: Hunting Off the Hook?

Hunting Off the Hook?

By | July 1, 2015

Historical data shed new light on the possible causes of southern sea lion decline in the Falkland Islands.

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image: Intelligence Gathering

Intelligence Gathering

By | July 1, 2015

Disease eradication in the 21st century

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image: Metazoans in the DNAi Club

Metazoans in the DNAi Club

By | July 1, 2015

A chance discovery results in the first report of DNA-based gene silencing in an animal.

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image: Orb-iters

Orb-iters

By | July 1, 2015

See how William Beebe and Otis Barton descended to the ocean's depths in an early submersible designed to allow access to the mysterious lifeforms inhabiting the deep sea.

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image: Sold on Symbiosis

Sold on Symbiosis

By | July 1, 2015

A love of the ocean lured Nicole Dubilier into science; gutless sea worms and their nurturing bacterial symbionts keep her at the leading edge of marine microbiology.

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image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

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image: New Human Brain Language Map

New Human Brain Language Map

By | June 26, 2015

Researchers find that Wernicke’s area, thought to be the seat of language comprehension in the human brain for more than a century, is not.

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image: Week in Review: June 22–26

Week in Review: June 22–26

By | June 26, 2015

Neanderthal-human hybrid discovered; the neurobiology of fear behavior; and an insulin patch that responds to high glucose levels in mice

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image: The Brain on Fear

The Brain on Fear

By | June 25, 2015

Scientists uncover the neurons in the mouse brain responsible for linking the sight of a looming object to scared behavior.

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image: Hawkmoth Brains Slow During Dusk Meals

Hawkmoth Brains Slow During Dusk Meals

By | June 15, 2015

This helps the insects collect as much visual information as possible from the gently swaying flowers on which they dine.

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