The Scientist

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image: Behavior Brief

Behavior Brief

By | September 2, 2015

A round-up of recent discoveries in behavior research

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image: A Fishy Chorus

A Fishy Chorus

By | September 1, 2015

Watch the coelacanth documentary that fish biologist Eric Parmentier and filmmaker Laurent Ballesta were making when they discovered and recorded a world of undersea sound.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2015

Brain Storms, Orphan, Maize for the Gods, and Paranoid.

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image: Musical Scales

Musical Scales

By | September 1, 2015

The quest to document an ancient sea creature reveals a cyclical chorus of fish songs.

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image: Speaking of Science

Speaking of Science

By | September 1, 2015

September 2015's selection of notable quotes

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image: Whaling Specimens, 1930s

Whaling Specimens, 1930s

By | September 1, 2015

Fetal specimens collected by commercial whalers offer insights into how whales may have evolved their specialized hearing organs.

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image: Study: Short Headlines Get More Citations

Study: Short Headlines Get More Citations

By | August 27, 2015

Scientific journals that publish papers with snappier titles accrue more citations per paper, according to a report.

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image: Opinion: Making Progress by Slowing Down

Opinion: Making Progress by Slowing Down

By | August 24, 2015

Academic research could be strengthened by thinking more and doing less.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Life on the Edge</em>

Book Excerpt from Life on the Edge

By | August 1, 2015

In Chapter 4, “The quantum beat,” authors Johnjoe McFadden and Jim Al-Khalili rethink Newton’s apple from a quantum-biological perspective.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | August 1, 2015

Gods of the Morning, Hedonic Eating, A Beautiful Question, and Genomic Messages

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