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image: Tessa Hill Wants to Save the Bivalves

Tessa Hill Wants to Save the Bivalves

By | July 1, 2016

The UC Davis oceanographer reconstructs ancient climate and studies the present impacts of global warming in an attempt to stave off environmental damage.

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image: The Earth's Changing Seas

The Earth's Changing Seas

By | July 1, 2016

Marine pathogens flourish in oceans that are warmer and more acidic.

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image: Well-Brined Pork

Well-Brined Pork

By | July 1, 2016

Watch what happens when marine organisms have their way with a sunken pig carcass.

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image: Changing Oceans Breed Disease

Changing Oceans Breed Disease

By | July 1, 2016

In the planet’s warming and acidifying oceans, species from corals to lobsters and fish are succumbing to pathogenic infection.

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image: Inside the Expedition Discovering New Coral Reefs

Inside the Expedition Discovering New Coral Reefs

By | July 1, 2016

As technology takes science deeper into the world’s oceans, researchers are discovering reef systems far from warm, shallow tropical waters.

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image: Bleached Corals “Sickest” Scientists Have Ever Seen

Bleached Corals “Sickest” Scientists Have Ever Seen

By | June 21, 2016

Researchers assess which parts of the Great Barrier Reef that have lost their vivid color are likely to die and which parts may pull through.

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Ancient DNA research suggests that there were two independent agricultural revolutions more than 10,000 years ago.

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image: Identifying Resilient Reefs

Identifying Resilient Reefs

By | June 16, 2016

Researchers identify areas where marine ecosystems are faring better or worse than predicted in hopes of saving the world’s corals.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Wondrous Truths</em>

Book Excerpt from Wondrous Truths

By | June 1, 2016

In Chapter 2 author J.D. Trout highlights the dividing line between truth and scientific “fact.”

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image: Coral Currents

Coral Currents

By | June 1, 2016

Researchers at MIT and the Weizmann Institute of Science discover the ultility of coral cilia in creating water currents that bring food and move molecules around the colonial organisms.

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