The Scientist

» marine biology and developmental biology

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image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

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image: Sperm From Ovaries

Sperm From Ovaries

By | June 11, 2015

With the deletion of a single gene, female Japanese rice fish can produce sperm. 

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image: Biosphere Researcher Killed in Accident

Biosphere Researcher Killed in Accident

By | June 2, 2015

University of Arizona Professor Raphael Sagarin has died. He was struck by a truck while riding his bicycle.

2 Comments

image: Warm-Blooded Fish

Warm-Blooded Fish

By | May 15, 2015

The opah, or moonfish, is a deep-sea fish that regulates its body temperature more like a mammal than any of its finned kin, researchers have determined.

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image: Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

Dino Snouts from Chicken Beaks

By | May 13, 2015

Researchers tweak gene expression in chicken embryos that may have been crucial to the evolutionary transition from dinosaur noses to bird bills.

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image: Similar Strokes

Similar Strokes

By | April 29, 2015

Physics drove the convergent evolution of swimming in 22 unrelated marine species, a study suggests.

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image: Viral Protector

Viral Protector

By | April 21, 2015

A retrovirus embedded in the human genome may help protect embryos from other viruses, and influence fetal development.

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image: Study: Acidic Oceans Behind Extinctions

Study: Acidic Oceans Behind Extinctions

By | April 13, 2015

Massive die-offs of just about every marine species millions of years ago are thought to have resulted from a surge of carbon dioxide.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

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