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image: CRISPR Therapy to Enter Trials

CRISPR Therapy to Enter Trials

By | July 25, 2016

Researchers in China will use the CRISPR-Cas9 system to edit T cells extracted from patients with cancer before those cells are returned to the body to target malignant ones.

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image: GM Mosquitoes Reduce Dengue Cases in Brazil

GM Mosquitoes Reduce Dengue Cases in Brazil

By | July 18, 2016

Field data from the biotech company Oxitec show that releasing genetically modified male mosquitoes whose offspring die helped reduce dengue cases by 90 percent in one year.

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A 3-D carbon nanotube mesh enables rat spinal tissue sections to reconnect in culture.

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Mismatched ancestral origins of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA boost mouse health.

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image: Amazonian Reef

Amazonian Reef

By | July 1, 2016

See footage from the expedition that discovered a coral reef hiding beneath the massive muddy plume at the mouth of the Amazon River.

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image: How High Fat and Insulin Levels May Lead to Diabetes

How High Fat and Insulin Levels May Lead to Diabetes

By | July 1, 2016

Lipids and insulin play important roles in blood sugar regulation, and altered levels of either could kick start metabolic dysfunction.

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image: Long-Distance Calls

Long-Distance Calls

By | July 1, 2016

Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute researcher Peter Tyack expresses the beauty of marine mammal communication.

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image: Oysters At Risk

Oysters At Risk

By | July 1, 2016

Climate change is causing ocean acidification, and shellfish, such as oysters, are bearing the brunt of the shift.

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image: Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

Peter Tyack: Marine Mammal Communications

By | July 1, 2016

The University of St. Andrews behavioral ecologist studies the social structures and behaviors of whales and dolphins, recording and analyzing their acoustic communications.

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image: Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

Submerged Pigs Inform Forensics

By | July 1, 2016

Watching the decomposition of pig carcasses anchored to the seafloor is helping forensic researchers understand what to expect of human remains dumped in the ocean.

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