The Scientist

» marine biology and ecology

Most Recent

image: Six-Legged Syringes

Six-Legged Syringes

By | September 1, 2014

Researchers whose work requires that they draw blood from wild animals are finding unlikely collaborators in biting insects.

2 Comments

image: The Iceman Cometh

The Iceman Cometh

By | September 1, 2014

Meet Ötzi, the Copper Age ice man who is helping scientists reconstruct changes in the population genetics of the red deer he hunted.

0 Comments

image: This Bug Sucks

This Bug Sucks

By | September 1, 2014

An assassin bug, which some researchers are using as living syringes to sample blood from birds and mammals, feeds on a bat.

2 Comments

image: Splitting Hairs

Splitting Hairs

By | September 1, 2014

Fragments of mitochondrial DNA from deer hair found on the clothing of an ice-entombed mummy offer a glimpse into Copper Age ecology.

0 Comments

image: Beyond the Blueprint

Beyond the Blueprint

By , and | September 1, 2014

In addition to serving as a set of instructions to build an individual, the genome can influence neighboring organisms and, potentially, entire ecosystems.

9 Comments

image: Subglacial Ecosystem

Subglacial Ecosystem

By | August 22, 2014

Samples from an Antarctic lake 800 meters below the ice reveal an abundance of microbial life.

0 Comments

image: “Shark Week” Veers Into Fiction . . . Again

“Shark Week” Veers Into Fiction . . . Again

By | August 13, 2014

Researchers claim they were duped into participating in mockumentaries that aired during the Discovery Channel’s weeklong celebration of all things shark.

7 Comments

image: Killer Jelly Found in Australian Waters

Killer Jelly Found in Australian Waters

By | August 11, 2014

The newly discovered species of Irukandji jellyfish can cause stroke and heart failure in humans it stings.

0 Comments

image: Meal Plans

Meal Plans

By | August 1, 2014

Bacterial populations’ differing strategies for responding to their environment can set genetic routes to speciation.

1 Comment

image: Seeing Red

Seeing Red

By | August 1, 2014

Reef fish, once thought to be unable to see red wavelengths, not only fluoresce deep red, but males of some species react to seeing their own bioluminescent pattern.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Next Generation: Nanotube Scaffolds Reconnect Spinal Neurons
  2. Mapping the Human Connectome
    Daily News Mapping the Human Connectome

    A new map of human cortex combines data from multiple imaging modalities and comprises 180 distinct regions.

  3. Will Organs-in-a-Dish Ever Replace Animal Models?
  4. Your Office Has a Distinct Microbiome
RayBiotech