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image: Week in Review, May 13–17

Week in Review, May 13–17

By | May 17, 2013

Reading pathogen epigenomes; a new stem cell; dealing with research misconduct; monkey fossils; exploratory mice grow new neurons; watching metamorphosis


image: Opinion: Ethics Training in Science

Opinion: Ethics Training in Science

By | May 14, 2013

The NIH has required researchers to receive instruction about responsible conduct for more than 20 years, but misconduct is still on the rise.


image: Opinion: Remediating Misconduct

Opinion: Remediating Misconduct

By | May 14, 2013

Should institutions invest in changing the behavior of scientists found guilty of violating research rules and ethics?


image: Week in Review: May 6 – 10

Week in Review: May 6 – 10

By | May 10, 2013

Telomeres and disease; Wolbachia-infected mosquitoes may fight malaria; bat tongue mops nectar; newly sequenced genomes


image: Dutch Researcher Retracts More Papers

Dutch Researcher Retracts More Papers

By | May 6, 2013

Fifty-three studies authored by shamed Tilburg University social psychologist Diederik Stapel have now been pulled from the literature.


image: Week in Review: April 29 – May 2

Week in Review: April 29 – May 2

By | May 3, 2013

The brain’s role in aging; tracking disease; understanding the new flu virus; no autism-Lyme link; one drug’s journey from bench to bedside


image: Bacterial Conduit

Bacterial Conduit

By | May 1, 2013

Desulfobulbaceae bacteria were recently discovered to form centimeter-long cables, containing thousands of cells that share an outer membrane.


image: Contributors


By | May 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2013 issue of The Scientist.


image: Down for the Count

Down for the Count

By | May 1, 2013

One, two, three, four . . . . Counting colonies and plaques can be tedious, but tools exist to streamline the process.

1 Comment

image: Electric Microbe Hairs

Electric Microbe Hairs

By | May 1, 2013

USC researcher Mohamed El-Naggar demonstrates how some bacteria grow electrical wires that allow them to link up in big biological circuits.

1 Comment

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